November 19, 2006

A Garinagu Parade

I just came in from watching the Garifuna Settlement Day parade here in Orange Walk. It was short but sweet and just what you’d expect from a parade on the 19th of November in Belize: colors, drums, and Garinagu people. Happy Garifuna Settlement Day everyone!

5 comments:

DannyMaldito said...

Framed by armageddon on Sun, 2006-11-19 13:23.

reality of the facts. I don't have a problem with Garifuna on an individual level, but I do have a problem with them on a collective level.

Garifuna, like the blacks in the U.S.A. walk around with a chip on their shoulder; like they are owed something.

I lived in Dangriga for 3 years and I can't lie on the reality of what i experienced; these people are proud indeed, but i can't understand why they behave the way they do; example: they are lazy, filthy (as in they don't seem to care about their surrounding; aesthetically - the neighborhood i lived in, they dumped all their garbage in an empty lot next door), obnoxious, AIDS infected (this one is a real serious problem), thief (I got burglarized twice while living in Dangriga - $4,000 worth of stuff) and on and on.

I am sorry dude, but i think Garifuna people, collectively, are capable of so much more but they are pathetic. I remember after Hurricane Iris, these people wanted people from other towns, especially Placencia Village to come help them clean their own village (lazy), BTL donated ALL the houses to Seine Bight Village (always looking for a hand out), not one house went to a person in Placencia Village, I have family their, and i thought that was fucked up on so many levels.

As far as i am concerned PM George Price should have finished what he started and move them all to Georgetown cause they are only taking up valuable real estate on the Coast; they are doing it in Honduras right now.

And don't even bother wasting your time blowing your top from my comments, because one of my best friends is from Dangriga and he feels the same way I feel along with many other people (Garifuna) i knew.

talking about the drug problem in Belize is taboo.

As you would say:
Black ppl do this,white ppl do that.

seems like a lot, though i live in the deep 36 the heart of the south and the core of of the blacks. I haven't seen or been to any garinagu activity, and you live all the way up north and you are accessible to all that? lol
cool.
Well, Don't want you to get me wrong, I am not racist I just wantd you to see a lil something I found. Wanted to hear ur point of view...

Leonardo Melendez said...

There are two ways I could comment on this one, one's harsher than the next but...

Method 1:
I feel what you feel Danny boy. There was once a time when their acts were justifiable by poverty, education, and suppression from the white community, but those days are long gone. People aren't racist towards black people in these areas of the bush; they are simply being realistic. In fact, them coloureds lead themselves to their own doom. Don't agree? I got 3 words for you: Check The Facts! Because they kill, steel, and do the unimaginable. It's not a bad thing to be racist and like Carlos Mencia once said: "We all are (racist)".

Method 2:
Generalization is so unfair. Blacks shouldn't be judged; no one should. For if i where the only black man inside a crowd of a thousand, and I was different, then I shouldn't be profiled, for I am the different one, the one that has worked to be treated equally. What I'm saying is, we all have colored friends but none of them are the same, every black family recovered differently from slavery, every black family have their reasons for being lazy, poor, uneducated...; they all have their own stories. The past affects us all and it is up to us to understand why we behave the way we do. Some of us will realize it and overcome it, others (the uneducated) won't realize it much less be fit to overcome it, much less to do anything about it.

Don't hat me for this, because I know I caused some commotion ;)

(do you have to ask) Beth said...

Someone once told me that it is not good to be racist, but it is healthy and vital to be racially conscious. We have to understand that ethnic groups (or races) are defined by their culture and paradigms.

I think you all have a healthy view. As a foreigner (Alein!), I have often run head to head with someone's pre-conceived idea of what I am so suppose to be about. People find it strange that I am not like what they think I should be. I invite anyone of you to take a walk down town with me and watch the reaction of taximen, vendors and others have when they see this sweet little girl walk down the street. The sick thing is that even those who I see week after week and year after year continueously hassle me. I used to be upset by it, but I have learned to deal with it... all in the name of being racially conscious. I still loath to go out this time of year though (tourist season).

I remember when I was younger and boycrazy (we all grow up) I had a primary school fling with a nice young boy from standard six. It was sweet while it lasted and I didn't even notice that his skin was as black as a freshly shined shoe. He was a great guy. After the fling was over though, you should have heard the racist things (from all sorts of people Clear Creole's, Mesitzos, whites, Caribs... you name it). I think it was then I realized that people see things differently then I do.

I don't know when I will get married... but I know that when I do, my prince will be chosen by things other then his ethicity or race.

Leonardo Melendez said...

Someday I'll start to reason like Beth. Until then, I'll stick to my conviction that we're all different and are thus expected to act differently. Oh yes, and don't offend anyone :)

Anonymous said...

I don't want you to think like me!!!!!